Abstract

ABSTRACT:

Black and poor students are suspended from U.S. schools at higher rates than White and nonpoor students. While the existence of these disparities has been clear, the causes of the disparities have not. We use a novel data set to examine how and where discipline disparities arise. By comparing the punishments given to Black and White (or poor and nonpoor) students who fight one another, we address a selection challenge that has kept prior studies from identifying discrimination in student discipline. We find that Black and poor students are, in fact, punished more harshly than the students with whom they fight.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1548-8004
Print ISSN
0022-166X
Pages
pp. 711-748
Launched on MUSE
2021-07-17
Open Access
No
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