Abstract

Abstract:

The problem of free speech in relation to political power is a major issue of Ovid’s Tristia and ex Ponto collections. A complex blending of literary and rhetorical features allows the poet in exile to associate his self-representation in Tomis with a comprehensive review of his poetic career. From some programmatic statements in Tristia 2, I revisit Ovid’s manipulation of speech in exile. The poet’s persuasive goal about his exilic situation involves the emperor but also a wider audience, which is invited to reconsider Ovid’s poetic status on the margins of the empire and in the margins, or at least between the lines, of his text.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6504
Print ISSN
0004-0975
Pages
pp. 175-189
Launched on MUSE
2021-06-30
Open Access
No
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