Abstract

Abstract:

This article revisits a topic of major importance in the study of ancient Greek historiography: Herodotus' use of inscriptions—a significant group of textual sources in his Histories. The analysis centres on his decidedly varied application of epigraphic records. It shows how the Herodotean narrator sometimes looks to draw out the limitations of certain inscribed materials as accurate records of the past, which thus serve as a foil for his own commemorative writing. But the discussion also investigates ways in which inscriptions serve other, more positive ends in Herodotus' narrative, not least by functioning as a further form of proof and validation for some of his more controversial ideas, or by serving to underline a theme that recurs elsewhere in his text.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-3168
Print ISSN
0002-9475
Pages
pp. 217-257
Launched on MUSE
2021-06-03
Open Access
No
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