Abstract

Abstract:

In Books 9 and 10 of the Odyssey, Odysseus' companions promote the equal distribution of the spoils of their return voyage. This article argues that, as part of their commitment to social equality, the companions experiment with egalitarian modes of spectatorship and dining during the Aeolus and Lotus episodes. In these aesthetic encounters, the companions subvert Odysseus' position as the focus and focalizer of the narrative. The companions thus serve as an internal audience, figuring for the poem's external audiences an alternative form of narrative experience that resists the poem's centripetal orientation around the homecoming of a single, elite protagonist.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-3168
Print ISSN
0002-9475
Pages
pp. 177-216
Launched on MUSE
2021-06-03
Open Access
No
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