In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:

  • Letter from the Editor
  • Kevin M. Lerner

When I was twelve or thirteen years old, I was going to be a fighter pilot when I grew up. So of course I subscribed to Flying magazine. By sixteen, I'd abandoned that dream and had settled instead on becoming a rock guitarist. Guitar Player and Rolling Stone started arriving in my mailbox. Then a high school teacher told me I could be a writer, and suddenly I began (so far lifelong) subscriptions to the New Yorker and the Atlantic. When I moved to New York City, I added New York and Time Out New York to my list.

All these magazines were reflections of my identity, and they also worked to shape my identity. Magazines have the power to encapsulate sensibility and, in some cases, to create a whole sensibility, to define a community of readers, or sum up a whole decade of public life.

Many of the works in this issue of the Journal of Magazine Media play with ideas of identity. Wagner R. Arratia Concha explores how football—soccer to me—magazines use social media to shape the identities of their brands. Tara Marie Mortensen, Khadija Ejaz, and Carol J. Pardun have researched how People magazine stereotypes women. Newly Paul and Gregory Perreault examine how magazines play with the visual identity of Donald Trump. And David O. Dowling explores how the activist journalism of Meena Kandasamy helped build a political movement in India.

I hope that you see reading the Journal of Magazine Media as a part of your own identity. The editors and contributors here have helped to shape something that we feel has a unique voice among scholarly journals, and we are happy to have you as a part of our community. [End Page vii]

Kevin M. Lerner
Marist College
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Additional Information

ISSN
2576-7895
Print ISSN
2576-7887
Pages
p. vii
Launched on MUSE
2021-05-24
Open Access
No
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