Abstract

summary:

Despite the long debate over whether it was composed in the third or fourth century c.e., Heliodorus's Aithiopika has usually been understood through the imperial literary contexts which characterize earlier novels. This article inverts this perspective to explore instead how the novel fits into contemporary late antique considerations about fiction. By reading the Aithiopika against late-fourth and early-fifth century discussions of falsehood and plausibility found in Augustine and Gregory of Nyssa, this article argues that the Aithiopika not only reworks classical models for reading fiction, but also illuminates late antique concerns about fiction, falsehood, and belief.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2575-7199
Print ISSN
2575-7180
Pages
pp. 203-235
Launched on MUSE
2021-05-01
Open Access
No
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