Abstract

Abstract:

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, many U.S. business leaders resolved to go "beyond compliance" with environmental regulations. Manufacturers sought to become more eco-efficient by reducing how much waste they produced per unit of output. Some companies developed greener products. However, the new commitment to sustainability only went so far: Few executives fundamentally rethought their business models. What drove the rise of corporate concern about sustainability, and why did those drivers fall short? The incentives to become greener were partial. They affected some companies more than others, and they only rewarded efforts to reduce some environmental impacts. By analyzing the limits of corporate interest in sustainability in the late 1980s and early 1990s, this article offers fresh insight into the challenge of greening the economy.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1467-2235
Print ISSN
1467-2227
Pages
pp. 409-437
Launched on MUSE
2021-04-28
Open Access
No
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