Abstract

Abstract:

This article considers the significance of the Blessed Isles in Nietzsche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra. They are the isolated locale to which Zarathustra and his fellow creators retreat in the Second Part of the book. I trace Zarathustra's Blessed Isles back to the ancient Greek paradisiacal afterlife of the makarōn nēsoi and frame them against Nietzsche's Platonic conception of philosophers as "commanders and legislators," but I argue that they represent something more like a modern Epicurean Garden. Ultimately, I suggest that Zarathustra's Epicurean impulse toward withdrawal (whether into a sequestered friendship community or mountain solitude) undermines his Platonic attempts at great politics.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1538-4594
Print ISSN
0968-8005
Pages
pp. 135-163
Launched on MUSE
2021-04-20
Open Access
No
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