Abstract

Abstract:

In this article, I reply to commentators Leonard Feldblyum, Robert Holub, and David Owen on my article "The Biology of Evil." While I concede that Nietzsche often invoked standard degenerationist rhetoric about breeding, I argue that Nietzsche, unlike other degenerationists, never offered any concrete plans for such breeding and was not interested in raising the capacities of average citizens, but rather was concerned with the exceptional few. I argue that these "strokes of luck" do not readily lend themselves to planned breeding programs. I concede that Nietzsche did not favor societies that allowed for the integration of foreign elements, but rather some alternation between regimented hierarchical societies and motley societies. However, against Holub's and Feldblyum's contention that Nietzsche was interested in the alleged Jewish problem of his day, I expand on my claim that, for Nietzsche, the current malaise is more a product of the workings of the ancient than the modern Jews. And against Owen and Holub, I defend the claim that degeneration theory was fundamentally Manichean and that Nietzsche resisted this Manichean tendency.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1538-4594
Print ISSN
0968-8005
Pages
pp. 65-77
Launched on MUSE
2021-04-20
Open Access
No
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