Abstract

Abstract:

This essay reconsiders the much-remarked flatness of Ishiguro's style in Never Let Me Go in light of the novel's textual history. Drawing on the Kazuo Ishiguro Papers at the University of Texas at Austin, I show how Ishiguro's compositional practice courts and complicates problems of critical sympathy and identification. Readerly sympathy remains in doubt even when Kathy H.'s narrative develops lyrical tendencies. As Ishiguro turns what Zadie Smith calls "lyrical realism" into the object of stylistic cloning, he revives the case for critical distance established earlier in the novel.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-658X
Print ISSN
0026-7724
Pages
pp. 171-204
Launched on MUSE
2021-03-31
Open Access
No
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