In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:

CONTRIBUTORS Erik K. Pratt is Associate Professor of International Relations and Chair of the Political Science Department at Carroll College, Mon­ tana. His previous work on missile defense is Selling Strategic Defense: Interests, Ideologies, & the Arms Race (Lynne Rienner, 1990). Andrew Scobell is Associate Research Professor of National Secu­ rity Affairs in the Strategic Studies Institute of the U.S. Army War College. His research focus is on Asian political and military affairs. He has published on the 1995-1996 Taiwan Strait Crisis in Political Science Quarterly. Gregory Gleason is Associate Professor of Political Science and Public Administration at the University of New Mexico. He is the author of Central Asian States: Discovering Independence (Westview Press, 1997), as well as articles in Comparative Strategy and Asian Perspective. Jih-Un Kim holds an M.A. degree in Northeast Asian Studies from the Graduate Institute of Peace Studies, Kyunghee University and is currently a Ph.D. candidate in the International Studies Program at the University of South Carolina. Michael D. Wallace is Professor of Political Science at the Univer­ sity of British Columbia. He has written extensively on the link­ ages between arms races and conflict and on processes of crisis decision making. He recently published (with Charles A. Meconis) Naval Arms Competition in East Asia (Greenwood Press, 2000). Brian L. Job is Professor of Political Science at the University of British Columbia. His research focuses on the evolving security order of the Asia Pacific. He is actively engaged in Track II regional security processes, including serving as Co-Chair of CSCAP's North Pacific Working Group. His most recent publication appears in Pacific Affairs (January, 2000). Jean Clermont is completing his doctoral studies at the University of British Columbia. His research is on the nature of competitive arms processes in regional rivalries. Andre Laliberte is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Ottawa. He has studied extensively the phenomenon of nationalism of the people of Taiwan. His publications include an article in Pacific Affairs (January, 2000) on risk assessment in the Taiwan Strait. Sheng Lijun is a Fellow at Institute of Southeast Asia Studies, Sin­ gapore. His research has focused on China's foreign relations and, especially, the Taiwan issue. His recent publications include China's Dilemma: the Taiwan Issue (London & New York: I.B. Tauris Aca­ demic Studies/Singapore: ISEAS, 2001) and The Tension Across the Taiwan Strait: From Lee Teng-hui's "Two States" Theory to Chen ShuiBian 's New Government (forthcoming). Ho-Ki Kim is Associate Professor of Sociology at Yonsei Universi­ ty. His major research interests include sociology of state and civil society in East Asia. He is author of Contemporary Capitalism and Korean Society (Seoul: Sahoebipyung Press, 1995) [in Korean] and Modernity and Social Changes in Korea (Seoul: Nanam Publishing House, 1999) [in Korean], Stephen Endicott is Professor of History at Atkinson College, York University, Toronto. Among his books, he is co-author, with Edward Hagerman, of United States Biological Warfare: Secrets of the Early Cold War and Korea (Indiana University Press, 1998). He has received the Killam Senior Fellowship and other academic awards while teaching East Asian history. Edward Hagerman is Professor of History at Atkinson College, York University, Toronto. He is co-author, with Stephen Endicott, of United States Biological Warfare: Secrets of the Early Cold War and Korea (Indiana University Press, 1998). He has published many articles on the origins of modern total war and has contributed to textbooks for various U. S. military academies. ...

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
2288-2871
Print ISSN
0258-9184
Pages
pp. 2-3
Launched on MUSE
2021-03-23
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.