Abstract

Abstract:

The political system in North Korea has been characterized as a "Suryong Dominant Party-State System.” Since the mid-1980s, however, its political system has displayed two interesting aspects. Formally, the broad "Suryong System" has been maintained; in practice, however, the Workers’ Party of Korea, the Korean People’s Army, and the government have come to acquire respectively different and considerably strengthened roles. Under this new regime, Kim Jong Il (Suryong) directly rules over the party, the government, and the military. Meanwhile, the political-ideological base, the military base, and the economic base are administered respectively by the party, the army, and the government. Interestingly, while the power of the party still overwhelms that of the military and the government, the party’s means of influence has changed from giving direct orders to providing provisions or encouraging policy outlines.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2288-2871
Print ISSN
0258-9184
Pages
pp. 87-109
Launched on MUSE
2021-03-23
Open Access
No
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