Abstract

ABSTRACT:

It has been argued that the Dewey Decimal Classification system—the DDC—is Hegelian, that the primary division of the system is based on Hegel’s philosophy. This article argues against this claim. It demonstrates that the underlying principle for the distribution of subjects in the DDC is not Hegelian and that the support for this idea was always weak. It also demonstrates that, as a classification principle, the supposed philosophy underlying the DDC is inconsequential and implies a reactionary image of knowledge. Fortunately, the DDC makes very little, if any, use of this philosophy. Hegel’s philosophy involves a sophisticated and detailed method for knowledge organization that has been completely unexplored. This article clears the ground for such exploration by disentangling Hegelian philosophy from the dated metaphysics allegedly underlying the DDC.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
2166-3033
Print ISSN
2164-8034
Pages
pp. 32-48
Launched on MUSE
2021-03-10
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.