Abstract

ABSTRACT:

This essay considers the major arguments of Adam Zachary Newton's Jewish Studies as Counterlife in light of the burgeoning subfield of Jewish ethics. Although in my view the book has a number of foundational flaws, I nevertheless see the book as contributing to a broader project in interdisciplinary critique and collaboration. Newton's diagnosis–that the academic field of Jewish studies has a largely impoverished notion of interdisciplinarity–invites a more expansive idea of this academic work across different geographical regions, time periods, academic specialties, and institutional categories. I argue that this vision may be particularly relevant for the field of Jewish ethics, which employs multiple modes of reasoning in service of urgent contemporary ethical questions.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1948-5077
Print ISSN
0271-9274
Pages
pp. 101-108
Launched on MUSE
2021-02-27
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.