Abstract

ABSTRACT:

In his first prologue, the first-century Latin poet Phaedrus promises that his fables offer a double dowry, laughter and life lessons. This article explores the central importance of laughter for Phaedrus, who defines his fables as jokes meant to inspire laughter and learning—but not anger. Laughter in the fables is a mark of intellectual superiority, a safe way to teach lessons (even for the powerless), and a way to punish those who deserve it.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1558-9234
Print ISSN
0009-8418
Pages
pp. 201-225
Launched on MUSE
2021-02-24
Open Access
No
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