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Mashriq & Mahjar 4, no. 1 (2017), 1-3 ISSN 2169-4435 EDITORIAL FOREWORD MASHRIQ & MAH)AR TODAY: MIGRATION STUDIES AT A CROSSROADS When Mashriq & Mahjarcame into being in 2013, it advocated "an alternative, diasporic vision" for the field of Middle East Studies. 1 Since that time, the journal has remained faithful to this aim. Its pages have become a hub for scholars who wander, and for research that does not fit neatly within clear-cut disciplinary boundaries. Refusing to be restricted by the pervasive "methodological regionalism" that continues to dominate the academy today, the work contained here hovers over the interstices ofvarious disciplinary and regional specializations. 2 To accommodate these broad landscapes, the journal's content spans disciplinary perspectives ranging from history, anthropology, sociology, and political science, to cultural studies and literary criticism. As globalization, technological innovation, and political conflicts dramatically increase the flow of people, information, goods, services, and resources across national and regional boundaries, a scholarly approach with a commensurately global vision is necessary. By examining the world "through diasporic eyes," the work featured in this journal endeavors to move beyond narrow ways ofthinking about peoples and cultures, languages and economies, faith and politics.' Such an approach enables its authors to ask new questions, to perceive and forge new connections. Thus, Mashriq & Mahjar has become a home for scholars who explore the lives and histories of diverse populations and their myriad representations, whether material, social, or imaginary. Since its inception, Mashriq & Mahjar has featured research on numerous diasporic populations worldwide. Its articles have tracked the peregrinations of Lebanese and Syrian populations throughout the Americas, West Africa, Australia, and the Philippines. Other contributions have shone new light on the historical legacies and lived realities of Armenian, Bahraini, Egyptian, Sephardi, Somali, and Tunisian diasporic communities. Side-by-side we have presented studies of Iranians in Texas juxtaposed with the political activism of Egyptian women in Paris, the philanthropic networks of rural Arab-Argentine women, and the complex cultural and institutional dynamics© Moise A. Khayrallah Centerfor Lebanese Diaspora Studies 2017 Mashriq & Mahjar 4, no. 1 (2017), 1-3 ISSN 2169-4435 EDITORIAL FOREWORD MASHRIQ & MAH)AR TODAY: MIGRATION STUDIES AT A CROSSROADS When Mashriq & Mahjarcame into being in 2013, it advocated "an alternative, diasporic vision" for the field of Middle East Studies. 1 Since that time, the journal has remained faithful to this aim. Its pages have become a hub for scholars who wander, and for research that does not fit neatly within clear-cut disciplinary boundaries. Refusing to be restricted by the pervasive "methodological regionalism" that continues to dominate the academy today, the work contained here hovers over the interstices ofvarious disciplinary and regional specializations. 2 To accommodate these broad landscapes, the journal's content spans disciplinary perspectives ranging from history, anthropology, sociology, and political science, to cultural studies and literary criticism. As globalization, technological innovation, and political conflicts dramatically increase the flow of people, information, goods, services, and resources across national and regional boundaries, a scholarly approach with a commensurately global vision is necessary. By examining the world "through diasporic eyes," the work featured in this journal endeavors to move beyond narrow ways ofthinking about peoples and cultures, languages and economies, faith and politics.' Such an approach enables its authors to ask new questions, to perceive and forge new connections. Thus, Mashriq & Mahjar has become a home for scholars who explore the lives and histories of diverse populations and their myriad representations, whether material, social, or imaginary. Since its inception, Mashriq & Mahjar has featured research on numerous diasporic populations worldwide. Its articles have tracked the peregrinations of Lebanese and Syrian populations throughout the Americas, West Africa, Australia, and the Philippines. Other contributions have shone new light on the historical legacies and lived realities of Armenian, Bahraini, Egyptian, Sephardi, Somali, and Tunisian diasporic communities. Side-by-side we have presented studies of Iranians in Texas juxtaposed with the political activism of Egyptian women in Paris, the philanthropic networks of rural Arab-Argentine women, and the complex cultural and institutional dynamics© Moise A. Khayrallah Centerfor Lebanese Diaspora Studies 2017 2 Mashriq & Mahjar4, no. 1 (2017) of communities ofArab Presbyterians in Canada. Beside new explorations into socio-cultural and political linkages between Arab American...

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Additional Information

ISSN
2169-4435
Launched on MUSE
2021-01-13
Open Access
Yes
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