Abstract

abstract:

Research on Boko Haram has focused mostly on the group's violent actions. Underlying those actions, however, is a fairly deep-seated apocalyptic rhetoric that goes back to the preaching of Muhammad Yusuf (d. 2009). During the ten-year period since Boko Haram's transition toward activism, this use of apocalyptic rhetoric has become more pronounced. The question posed should be, is this an organic development within a Salafijihadist group that developed connections with the Islamic State during 2014–15 (and since) or is this rhetoric historic to northern Nigerian Islam going back to Shehu Usman Dan Fodio and his jihad? To what extent is Boko Haram beholden to its ideological forebearers in Nigeria from an apocalyptic point of view?

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Additional Information

ISSN
2156-7263
Print ISSN
2156-695X
Pages
pp. 184-195
Launched on MUSE
2021-01-12
Open Access
No
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