Abstract

Abstract:

Between the Enlightenment and the Premier Empire, at a time when the French State makes its appreciation of "les grands hommes" official and monumental, Jacques Delille's work creates a personal and original pantheon in which men of science are given a place. In his verses, which celebrate contemporary scientists in particular, he seeks to archive, through poetry, an image of the sciences of his time. To exalt scientists, Delille revives the motif of apotheosis. He also portrays them as types, in order to integrate them into our cultural heritage, thus giving his poetry a monumental function while shaping a particular connection between literature and science. Yet it is with omissions and reservations, according to his own ideas, that the poet builds this personal pantheon of science. (In French)

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Additional Information

ISSN
1536-0172
Print ISSN
0146-7891
Pages
pp. 96-113
Launched on MUSE
2020-11-24
Open Access
No
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