Abstract

ABSTRACT:

The shift from a cinematic to a post-cinematic media regime has occasioned a great deal of anxiety for theorists and spectators alike, and the horror genre has been adept at channeling this unease for its own purposes, as is evidenced in movies that revolve around the proliferation of digital devices and networks as new media for ghosts, demons, and other forms of evil. This article argues that the fears elicited in post-cinematic horror are more deeply rooted in the "discorrelation" of phenomenal experience and computational microtemporality.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2578-4919
Print ISSN
2578-4900
Pages
pp. 26-48
Launched on MUSE
2020-10-30
Open Access
No
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