Abstract

Abstract:

In this article, I offer a response to Rafe McGregor's Narrative Justice, in particular his notion of lucid phenomenological knowledge. By drawing on a discussion of lyric poetry, I argue that room needs to be made for the notion of perspective, which is more fundamental to our engagement with works of literature than narrative. I end with a suggestion of how to extend McGregor's account to accommodate the idea of perspective, which I call lucid phenomenological perspectival knowledge. Ultimately, what I argue is that the knowledge on offer in one's engagement with works of literature is not coming to know what some experience is like through the narrative construction but a form of self-knowledge that is available through the perspective that shapes the work (whether a narrative or non-narrative work).

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Additional Information

ISSN
1543-7809
Print ISSN
0021-8510
Pages
pp. 36-47
Launched on MUSE
2020-10-22
Open Access
No
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