Abstract

Abstract:

This paper interrogates how Reynolds's Newspaper covered the Great Exhibition in the first year of its run. By harnessing his newspaper's critique of the exhibition, George W. M. Reynolds promoted himself as an enemy to the aristocracy and a friend to his desired reading public of working people. Throughout 1851, the newspaper articulated a counter-narrative to the exhibition's rhetoric of class unity: first, by drawing on melodramatic Old Corruption narratives through its negative representation of Prince Albert, and second, by positioning Reynolds's as an advocate for workmen on the Crystal Palace. This coverage illustrates Reynolds's complex but lucrative position at the intersection of popular culture and radical politics.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1712-526X
Print ISSN
0709-4698
Pages
pp. 313-337
Launched on MUSE
2020-10-17
Open Access
No
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