Abstract

ABSTRACT:

This study explores pictorial narrativity in Venetian painter Lorenzo Lotto’s Portrait of a Young Man in his Studio (ca. 1527), with attention to the visual representation of mental activity as a prompt for the projection of viewers’ storyworld possible selves. The study discusses the extent to which the portrayed gentleman’s intriguing gaze, lost in introspection but at the same time seemingly fixed on viewers, can be considered a pictorial equivalent to the doubly-deictic you in verbal narratives. The doubly-deictic effect of the character’s gaze is further argued to provide access to the careful, dazzling accumulation of pictorial symbolism in the depicted studio as a pictorial stream-of-consciousness representation of the character’s frame of mind— memories, hopes, dreams, and fears—functioning in ways similar to paratactic accumulation in verbal narratives.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1538-974X
Print ISSN
1063-3685
Pages
pp. 251-268
Launched on MUSE
2020-09-26
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.