Abstract

abstract:

Researchers on workplace bullying have confirmed that abusive work conditions can lead to depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress. However, little research has been conducted to examine the impact of workplace bullying on the target's desire for physical intimacy. Using the spill-over theory to consider how workplace stress interferes with the home domain, this study utilizes a chi-square analysis to determine if Black women are more likely to experience a decreased desire for physical intimacy because of workplace bullying. With a sample of 542 people from higher education and 109 Black women within that sample, the study confirmed that Black women respondents are more likely to experience a decreased desire for physical intimacy because of workplace bullying. Further, Black women, perhaps in an attempt to maintain the "strong Black woman" public persona, are also resorting to medication and alcohol to cope with workplace bullying. Board Certified African Centered/Black psychologists, who are culturally sensitive to the bias related pressures Blacks face, are recommended to help Black women cope with workplace bullying and manage the intersecting factors of racism and sexism, which contribute to Black women's workplace bullying experiences.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2376-7510
Print ISSN
2334-2668
Pages
pp. 99-114
Launched on MUSE
2020-09-15
Open Access
No
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