Abstract

Abstract:

With the end of the Japanese student movement in 1970, activists of the militant New Left sought a new revolutionary subject. Turning their attention toward Japan's minorities, activists discovered the day laborers in the "inner colony" of Osaka's Kamagasaki district. Calling for revolution by the lumpenproletariat, the activists now understood the salaried working majority as colonial oppressors. As manifestation of this political shift, the Anti-Japanese Front of 1974 practiced terrorism, bombing several companies, injuring and killing white-collar workers. This article shows how the violence by anti-Japanese activists was entangled in anti-imperialist theory, social movement praxis, and the shift away from class politics.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1549-4721
Print ISSN
0095-6848
Pages
pp. 395-422
Launched on MUSE
2020-08-06
Open Access
No
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