Abstract

Abstract:

At a crucial juncture in his famous lectures on “Citizenship and Social Class,” English sociologist T. H. Marshall explained that the new social rights he associated with the invention of the twentieth-century welfare state were in fact a blast from the past—a bequest from the moral economy to a later age grappling with political economy run amok. Marshall’s celebrated theory of social rights that followed provides one aperture from which to intervene in a dispute brewing between starkly alternative views of the relevance today of the moral economy tradition he invoked.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2151-4372
Print ISSN
2151-4364
Pages
pp. 235-240
Launched on MUSE
2020-07-28
Open Access
No
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