Abstract

abstract:

The New Yorker, founded in 1925, was well-positioned to influence the reception of Anglo-American literary modernism. Although the magazine frequently paid attention to modernism, it did not make a special point of championing or publishing modernist writers. An illuminating exception in this regard was the experimental modernist writer Robert Myron Coates (1897–1973), who had a life-long association with the New Yorker, while also crafting a career in distinctly experimental writing. Coates’s work and career is emblematic of the interconnectedness between advanced modernism, its middlebrow manifestations, and American popular culture.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2152-9272
Print ISSN
1947-6574
Pages
pp. 113-126
Launched on MUSE
2020-07-14
Open Access
No
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