Abstract

PRECIS:

Since the nineteenth century, Christians in Canada have been committed to cooperating with one another on building up the country's social well-being. With the emergence of the modern ecumenical movement in the twentieth century, this work was undertaken first by the Canadian Council of Churches and then in the 1970's and 1980's by Canada's Inter-Church Coalitions, which worked actively on sociopolitical issues. At the same time, those decades saw the beginning of Canada's greatest period of secularization, wherein the percentage of those claiming "no religious affiliation" rose from 4% in 1971 to 24% in 2011. This essay studies whether there is any correlation between ecumenical sociopolitical activity and the rise in "nones."

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Additional Information

ISSN
2162-3937
Print ISSN
0022-0558
Pages
pp. 211-228
Launched on MUSE
2020-07-14
Open Access
No
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