Abstract

Abstract:

Dignāga's strict non-conceptualism about perception has proven difficult to defend. Not only were there facts known to epistemologists of Dignāga's school that are hard to reconcile with his bright line of separation between perception and inference; results from neuroscience also call it into question. This essay draws on resources from both Buddhist epistemology and recent philosophy of mind in order to seek a more defensible form of non-conceptualism.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1529-1898
Print ISSN
0031-8221
Pages
pp. 615-637
Launched on MUSE
2020-07-03
Open Access
No
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