Abstract

Abstract:

The recent attribution of The Family of Love solely to Lording Barry invites a repositioning of the playwright within his dramatic milieu, especially to his contemporaries and to the early modern comic tradition. His use of Christopher Marlowe's Ovid shapes our understanding of his forerunner's reception in the early seventeenth century. Such an act of imitation suggests a type of kinship between the poets and, to some extent, validates the idea of Marlowe as influence on the creation of city comedy, for we can credit Barry as the first to employ Hero and Leander for comic effect in dramatic form, a recognition oftentimes attributed to Ben Jonson.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1522-9270
Print ISSN
0039-3657
Pages
pp. 347-364
Launched on MUSE
2020-07-02
Open Access
No
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