Abstract

Abstract:

This article uses Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew as a case study to demonstrate how an early modern English discourse of benevolent domestic rule, evinced in horsemanship manuals, pedagogical treatises, and books of household governance, works to maintain the hierarchical status quo, even as it ostensibly critiques tyranny in domestic mastery. I argue that the play draws on detailed debates within horsemanship to cast Petruchio as a horse courser swindling the other gentlemen in the drama via Katharina's performance. In so doing, it encourages disinterest in the possibility of Katharina's resistance to or participation in Petruchio's scheme.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1522-9270
Print ISSN
0039-3657
Pages
pp. 257-276
Launched on MUSE
2020-07-02
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.