Abstract

Abstract:

Chilean post-dictatorship memorials not only fail to address intensifying dispossessions of Mapuche Indigenous peoples during and after dictatorship as part of the state's neoliberal agenda, but also elide the fact that dictatorial violence was but an iteration of the state's ongoing violence against the Mapuche. Reading Guillermo Calderón's 2011 play Villa across the grain reveals the inability to represent Chile's recent history without also contending with its violent past and present relationship to the Mapuche. The play's repeated invocation of the Mapuche word "marichiweu," translated as "we shall triumph tenfold," disrupts popular notions of historical memory in South America that are fixed in el pasado reciente, or "the recent past" (1965-1990s) by drawing a signifying genealogy of resistance and victory multidirectionally—from Mapuche triumph over Spanish colonization to a future triumph beyond the Chilean state.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
2161-0576
Print ISSN
0023-8813
Pages
pp. 81-104
Launched on MUSE
2020-06-16
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.