Abstract

Abstract:

Holy physicians (anargyroi) dominate an eighth-century program of encaustic paintings in the Church of the Holy Virgin at the monastery of Deir al-Surian, yet the site is not known to have been nor included a healing sanctuary. This essay considers theological and therapeutic meanings of this program in relation to the anti-Julianist controversy as it related to healing nurture of Christ’s body, eucharistic theology, diverse narratives of medicine, the vulnerable body, and pious defacement of holy images. A brief comparison with the Chapel of the Physicians at Rome and an Egyptian cave church suggests that Deir al-Surian’s anargyroi program was not unique in late antique liturgical architecture.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-3184
Print ISSN
1067-6341
Pages
pp. 255-282
Launched on MUSE
2020-06-10
Open Access
No
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