Abstract

Abstract:

American eugenicists in the 1930s saw housing programs as a vehicle for a new form of reproductive regulation promoting large families for the so-called fit while limiting family size among the so-called unfit. Housing developers, federal agencies, and real-estate associations used a eugenically informed racial hierarchy to justify redlining and preferential home loans that discriminated against African Americans and immigrants. Reframing this history from a feminist perspective, I argue that these practices were intended as a form of eugenic regulation that enforced women's role as reproducers. This reproductive agenda contributed to a legacy of race-based discrimination in housing, and disparities in wealth that resulted from those differences.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1934-1520
Print ISSN
0732-1562
Pages
pp. 67-83
Launched on MUSE
2020-05-15
Open Access
No
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