Abstract

This essay argues that the black-audience musical westerns of the late 1930s attempted to reconfigure African American national identity in their casting but also by strategically using anachronism and geographical juxtaposition. These westerns created a dual present by using the trope of contemporary Harlem alongside the nineteenth-century setting, thereby ironically echoing the western expansionist movement in a cinematic African American West.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-2087
Print ISSN
0009-7101
Pages
pp. 46-70
Launched on MUSE
2002-11-20
Open Access
N
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