Abstract

Abstract:

This essay considers medieval precarity and vulnerability through the example of Thomas Hoccleve, whose Regiment of Princes attests to a broad and varied discourse about the effects of marginalization, contingency, and economic insecurity and exploitation in late medieval English literature. Drawing on Judith Butler and others' work on the "politics of grief," I consider how Thomas Hoccleve uses his experience of personal loss and sorrow as an occasion to reflect on the precarious lives of those around him. In so doing, his work in the Regiment of Princes serves as an early example of how personal sorrow can become an imaginative catalyst for broader ethical reflection and advocacy

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Additional Information

ISSN
2162-9552
Print ISSN
2162-9544
Pages
pp. 8-26
Launched on MUSE
2020-05-04
Open Access
No
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