Abstract

Abstract:

Greek migration to the United States in the period 1890–1924 produced two interdependent domestic environments, the Greek towns of urban America and the remittance villages of rural Greece. Both spaces experienced decline, abandonment, and demolition during the mid-twentieth century, which erased a unique spatial duality maintained across continents by material goods. With the progressive passing of Greek American lived memories, archaeology must take on the challenge of reconstructing the immigrant lifeworlds that are now a century old. Using the family histories of three contemporary Greek Americans, we explore how village houses can illuminate the bridging of transnational distances. We study the house careers of three Elenis from the Peloponnese, Epirus, and Central Greece. Each case study explores the materialities of a relationship between today's Greek Americans and their lost familial domestic relics.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-3265
Print ISSN
0738-1727
Pages
pp. 85-108
Launched on MUSE
2020-04-28
Open Access
No
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