Abstract

Abstract:

David Lynch's film Blue Velvet (1986) tells the story of Jeffrey Beaumont, who becomes embroiled in a mystery surrounding a tortured nightclub singer. Lynch uses Jeffrey's journey as a lens through which to explore the insidious power of toxic heteropatriarchal masculinity. In this article, I explore Jeffrey's journey toward a new and respectful feminist masculinity. Although scholars have previously considered Jeffrey's evolution and the film's feminist politics, this essay's intervention lies in framing this examination through both sight and sound; in making this intervention, I draw on Lacanian theory to elucidate the film's relationship with desire and fantasy.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2578-4919
Print ISSN
2578-4900
Pages
pp. 1-22
Launched on MUSE
2020-04-25
Open Access
No
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