Abstract

Abstract:

Nearly thirty years after governments loosened control over broadcasters and publishers, Africa's media face increasing threats. New laws are resulting in the imprisonment of journalists and closure of media houses, while internet shutdowns and "social-media taxes" are increasingly common strategies to limit the mobilizing and informational potentials of digital technologies. These challenges are occurring in the midst of eroding public support for free media, as the latest Afrobarometer data show increased backing for government restrictions across the continent. Africans' confidence in their media seems to be declining, potentially due to concerns over bias, hate speech, and disinformation.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-3214
Print ISSN
1045-5736
Pages
pp. 96-109
Launched on MUSE
2020-04-09
Open Access
No
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