Abstract

Abstract:

Studies of literature and the Christian Right, like most studies of literature and religion, tend to operate under what Joseph North has recently called the "historicist/contextualist" paradigm of literary study. Departing from that consensus, this essay examines two novels germane to the study of the Christian Right—Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale and Marilynne Robinson's Lila—not to demonstrate their embeddedness in historical context, but to illustrate how their narratives imagine reading, belief, and perception in ways that reassert the value of literary criticism at a time when the Christian Right has attained unprecedented political power.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2056-5666
Print ISSN
0148-3331
Pages
pp. 15-35
Launched on MUSE
2020-03-28
Open Access
No
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