Abstract

Abstract:

Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is an FDA-approved treatment for symptoms of motor disorders—with experimental use for psychiatric disorders. DBS, however, causes a variety of side effects. Moral philosophers question DBS's influence on users' experiences of authenticity, identity, and/or autonomy. These characterizations of DBS, however, may not make sense of how DBS complicates, rather than simply impedes or bolsters, users' abilities to exercise agency. Empirical work exploring DBS users' lived-experiences and feminist accounts of relational autonomy demonstrate that the issues users face are better characterized in terms of the user's relationship to their stimulator, that is, in terms of "relational agency."

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Additional Information

ISSN
1937-4577
Print ISSN
1937-4585
Pages
pp. 134-154
Launched on MUSE
2020-03-20
Open Access
No
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