Abstract

abstract:

The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between racial socialization, racial identity, acculturative stress, body image, and self-esteem among African American college women. One hundred and forty-nine African American females participated in the study. To understand the relationship between primary variables, Pearson correlations were run. Standard and hierarchical regressions were run to assess the degree to which racial socialization, racial identity, and acculturative stress were predictors of body image and self-esteem. Results indicated that racial socialization was related to Body-Esteem Attribution and self-esteem. Additionally, racial centrality was related to both Body-Esteem-Weight and Attribution. Private Regard and acculturative stress were both positively associated with Body-Esteem Appearance and self-esteem. Findings have implications for research and mental health practice among emerging adult females of color.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2376-7510
Print ISSN
2334-2668
Pages
pp. 59-85
Launched on MUSE
2020-03-11
Open Access
No
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