Abstract

Abstract:

Tracing various historical and literary iterations of the trope of the prodigal son in the early context of Vietnamese travel abroad, this essay puts into question what it means to feel kinship to one's native culture and land. By focusing on important particularities of Vietnamese life and culture in the first half of the twentieth century, including increased diasporic mobility, a shift from ideographic to alphabetic writing systems, and new cultural influences from France, the author advances the argument that kinship, though uncanny and difficult to define, is not merely an automatic transfer of connection or relation from one generation to the next. Rather, kinship operates on a scale beyond the family, requiring a conscious questioning of one's identity in relation to one's place of origin.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1911-1568
Print ISSN
1044-2057
Pages
pp. 283-304
Launched on MUSE
2020-03-12
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.