Abstract

This historical essay argues that early feature-length films were not simply a new production trend; they represented a series of developments in distribution and exhibition based on differentiation. Indeed, the American film industry of the early 1910s followed several competing models of distribution in an effort to differentiate between the uniqueness of the feature and the standardization fostered by the short-subject program.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2578-4919
Print ISSN
2578-4900
Pages
pp. 35-56
Launched on MUSE
2001-02-01
Open Access
No
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