Abstract

ABSTRACT:

Joyce studies are typically relegated to university classrooms of graduate work because of their reputation for being too complex or esoteric for average readers. It is a reputation—sometimes deserved, but most often not—that has frustrated Joyce scholars for decades. As a high school English teacher in Florida, I noticed the immense potential of Joyce's works for a secondary classroom. Joyce's acclaimed short story, "The Dead," is the perfect introduction to the author and his many writings. Perspectives can range from Marxist to psychoanalytic; topics can run the gamut from sociology and politics to economics and religion; and literary elements can span from alliteration and symbolism to hyperbole and dichotomy. The Joyce unit I created for my 16-year-old students lasts a quarter of the school year, and while it culminates in a Ulysses Reading Group, having traversed through A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, its genesis is in "The Dead." The best part is that the students love it. Through this essay—and my accompanying online hub for teaching Joyce, <TeachingJoyce.com>—I hope to inspire other secondary and post-secondary teachers to engage with Joyce's works in the classroom for they will add great value and enrichment to the educational experience.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1938-6036
Print ISSN
0021-4183
Pages
pp. 369-379
Launched on MUSE
2020-02-27
Open Access
No
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