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  • About the Contributors

Owen Barden (bardeno@hope.ac.uk) is Associate Professor of Disability Studies at Liverpool Hope University. He is a core member of the Centre for Culture and Disability Studies, and Comments Editor for the Journal of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies. Among his publications he has chapters in Changing Social Attitudes Toward Disability (2014), Disability, Avoidance, and the Academy (2016), and A Cultural History of Disability (2019). His main research interest is in investigating relationships between disability, technology, literacies, and learning.

Lauren Beard (ldbeard2@gmail.com) is Rhetoric and Composition Doctoral Student and Graduate Instructor at Pennsylvania State University. She has published on disability in Southern Discourses in the Center: A Journal of Multiliteracy and Innovation. She is currently researching cripistemologies and disability composition practices in higher education as well as digital disability archival curation and performance.

David Bolt (Boltd@hope.ac.uk) is Professor of Disability Studies at Liverpool Hope University, where he is Director of the Centre for Culture and Disability Studies and the Disability Studies MA. He is editor-in-chief of the Journal of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies; a series editor of Literary Disability Studies; and a general editor of A Cultural History of Disability. His collaborative books comprise The Madwoman and the Blindman (2012), Changing Social Attitudes Toward Disability (2014), and Disability, Avoidance, and the Academy (2016), and he is author of The Metanarrative of Blindness (2014) and Cultural Disability Studies in Education (2019).

Brady James Forrest (bradyjforrest@gwu.edu) is a PhD candidate in the Department of English at George Washington University, where he also received his MA in American Studies. He has taught courses on queer studies and feminist disability studies at Georgetown University. He specializes in crip/queer theory, performance studies, Black studies, and affect theory.

Chris Foss (cfoss@umw.edu) is Professor of English at the University of Mary Washington, where he specializes in nineteenth-century British literature, with a secondary emphasis on disability studies. He served as the lead editor for Disability in Comic Books and Graphic Narratives (2016). His original talk for the Disability and the Emotions seminar series hosted by the Centre for Culture and Disability Studies at Liverpool Hope University, "'For the future let those who come to play with me have no hearts': The Affect of Pity in Oscar Wilde's 'The Birthday of the Infanta,'" was published as part of the Dis/ Enabling Narratives special issue of the Journal of Narrative Theory in 2017.

Holly Lightburn (Lightbh@hope.ac.uk) is Academic Support Worker to the Professor of Disability Studies at Liverpool Hope University, where she holds an English BA and a Disability Studies MA. She is a core member of the Centre for Culture and Disability Studies and has presented at Disability and Disciplines seminar series, Liverpool Hope University. Her research interests are in literary disability with a focus on family, gender, and sexuality. [End Page 129]

Rachael Nebraska Lynch (rachaellynch@gwu.edu) is a PhD student in the Department of English at George Washington University, where she recently completed her MA. She formerly worked as a high school teacher in the Vermont public school system. Based on her experiences teaching, she explores minoritarian participation in oppressive regimes. Her current project examines the roots of homonationalism, ablenationalism, and femonationalism in the British Empire during the long nineteenth century.

Ryan C. Parrey (rparrey@gmail.com) is Lecturer in Disability Studies at Eastern Washington University. His research is located at the intersection of phenomenology and disability studies and he is particularly interested in articulations of disablement beyond oppression. His teaching centers on the many ways that meanings of disability emerge from, and circulate between, private, personal, and social settings. He was the Society for Disability Studies Affiliated Scholar in 2015 and has served on the board of directors of the society since 2017.

Amy Redhead (redhead.amy84@gmail.com) is an ESRC doctoral researcher in the School of Sociology and Social Policy at the University of Leeds. She has an English Language and Special Educational Needs BA and a Disability Studies MA from Liverpool Hope University, where she won Best Performing Student in English Language (2017) and the Faculty of Education Prize for Academic...

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Additional Information

ISSN
1757-6466
Print ISSN
1757-6458
Pages
pp. 129-130
Launched on MUSE
2020-02-17
Open Access
No
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