Abstract

Abstract:

This study examined correlates of medical mistrust among African American men living in the East Bay. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis using survey data from 207 adult African American males, recruited from barbershops. We used linear regression to assess associations between socioeconomic status (SES) and two medical mistrust outcomes (mistrust of health care organizations (HCOs) and physicians). There was a strong relationship between health insurance, income, education, and mistrust. Insured subjects were 8.5% (95% CI –0.154 to –0.016) less likely to mistrust HCOs and 8.5% less likely (95% CI –0.145 to –0.025) to mistrust physicians. Those in the highest levels of income (>$60,000 annual income) or education (bachelor's degree or higher) were 5.4% (95% CI –0.115 to –0.007) and 5.7% (95% CI –0.104 to –0.011) less likely to mistrust HCO and physicians, respectively, than others. We conclude that sociodemographic factors are correlated with medical mistrust and discuss options for reducing medical mistrust.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1548-6869
Print ISSN
1049-2089
Pages
pp. 115-127
Launched on MUSE
2020-02-07
Open Access
No
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