Abstract

abstract:

In 1934, Esquire used the prospective publication of Langston Hughes’s “A Good Job Gone” as a foundational event in the creation of the magazine’s readership. Esquire sought to interpolate a consuming male audience by soliciting feedback on the magazine’s features and surveying its readership’s response to the potential publication of Hughes’s story. In so doing, Esquire shaped a community of reading that was influential to the developing culture of the professional-managerial class. Though the Hughes episode played a distinct role in the creation of Esquire’s community of reading, “A Good Job Gone” actually complicates the masculinity project proffered by Esquire.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
2152-9272
Print ISSN
1947-6574
Pages
pp. 27-51
Launched on MUSE
2020-02-05
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.