Abstract

ABSTRACT:

This paper investigates the effects of internal in-migration on cooperation in rural farming communities in Zambia. Potentially, in-migration could trigger discrimination, decrease overall levels of trust, and hence negatively impact the propensity for collective action. We measure cooperative behavior through self-reported survey information and incentivized decisions in a lab-in-the-field experiment. First, we find no evidence in the survey and experimental data that in-migration negatively affects cooperation across villages. Second, we find evidence that in villages where income inequalities between migrants and locals are more pronounced, migrants contribute more to public goods if exposed as the minority in the experiment. (JEL H41, O15)

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Additional Information

ISSN
1543-8325
Print ISSN
0023-7639
Pages
pp. 111-131
Launched on MUSE
2020-02-06
Open Access
No
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