Abstract

Abstract:

This article addresses the ways in which an explicitly political text was transformed in translation. Specifically, it analyzes Harriet de Onís's English translation of El águila y la serpiente (1928), Martín Luis Guzmán's semi-fictional memoir of the Mexican Revolution. The first English translation, titled The Eagle and the Serpent and published by Alfred A. Knopf in 1930, was an abridged version that reduced Guzmán's broad commentary to a novel about Francisco "Pancho" Villa, who was then a highly visible figure in the U.S. imaginary. This paper analyzes the ways in which de Onís's choices as a translator and editor refashioned the text for the U.S. market.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
2165-6185
Print ISSN
0018-2206
Pages
pp. 67-83
Launched on MUSE
2020-02-04
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.