Abstract

Abstract:

In a historical moment of ecological grief and generative possibility, we need to find resources to witness others and ourselves and to develop relational ways to stay in the trouble. This article examines particular troubles and opportunities—#MeToo, settler-indigenous relations, the violent judgements of social media, and particular classroom experiences—and asks how settler Canadians might re-learn our own traditions and uncover ways to live what Tim Lilburn calls being "undivided from one's earth." Julie Salverson uses herself as an example and looks at her Christian and Quaker activist roots and discusses her experiences as a teacher and writer making public claims in messy, contested situations. In the face of spiritual hunger, guilt, and confusion, what will it take to cultivate mutual respect and embrace the loopings of love and rage?

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Additional Information

ISSN
1920-941X
Print ISSN
0315-0836
Pages
pp. 34-40
Launched on MUSE
2020-02-03
Open Access
No
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